3 Misguided Claims of Attacks on Christmas (Reblog)

Jesus Without Baggage blog readers,

Today’s post is a reblog of a very popular article from last year that deals with three misguided claims of attacks on Christmas that show up each year:

1. Appeals to put Christ back in Xmas
2. Accusations of nativity scenes being banned at county courthouses, and
3. Insistence on ‘Merry Christmas’ as opposed to ‘Happy Holidays’

This article is being is being cross-posted on Jesus Baggage on Facebook and shared from there. But readers here can see the article by clicking below:

3 Misguided Claims of Attacks on Christmas

I hope you enjoy it, and I look forward to your comments!

~Tim

This entry was posted in favorite blogs, persecution and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

32 Responses to 3 Misguided Claims of Attacks on Christmas (Reblog)

  1. Reblogged this on Talmidimblogging and commented:
    Excellent piece

    Liked by 2 people

  2. JJS says:

    Amen. When I run into a Christian who is really pushy about “Merry Christmas” before the evening of the 24th, I want to ask them why they are waging the War On Advent.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. tonycutty says:

    What I find funny is that they trot out the same tripe every year. In the same way as the ‘World’ trot out their ‘Christmas Cheer’ (whatever the *** that means; sounds like a lot of people shouting their approval) and all the other stuff designd to get us to spend, spend, spend, so Christians do their ‘Christmas messages’ – whether it’s Christ back in Xmas, let’s not forget what Christmas really means, and all the other tired old things – and they do it as if it’s a new idea! Hey, let’s talk about Jesus this Christmas! Hey, let’s ‘remind’ people what it’s all about! It’s quite risible, to be honest.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. theotherlestrangegirl says:

    Interestingly, I read an article today about a woman who “offended” her Christian neighbors by decorating her yard with blow-up dragons for the holidays. They sent her a letter, asking her to please remove them and to ask God to show her the true meaning of Christmas.

    I’ll admit, the dragon thing is one I’ve never heard before. But the story proved to me that Christians will go out of their way to get offended about anything. Unless is someone is being cruel, malicious, or obscene in some way, I don’t see why people care how others choose to decorate.

    Liked by 1 person

    • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

      Strange Girl, a blow up dragon you say. I never heard of that either but why not? It’s not obscene or anything; why should anyone care or object? And asking God to show them the meaning of Christmas is simply insulting.

      Like

      • theotherlestrangegirl says:

        I had to come back and update because, as it turns out, the dragon theme continues! I recently had someone share an article with me that shows how the bible supposedly “proves” that fire-breathing dragons once existed. The person who shared it with me was so excited! I don’t believe it at all, and I find the author’s logic and reading of the text incredibly faulty, but I couldn’t help but be amused by the talk of dragons and religion again.

        Liked by 1 person

        • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

          Strange Girl, do you recall the text that supposedly mentions fire-breathing dragons? Other than Revelation (which conservatives often understand to be future–not past) I can’t think of anything else.

          Like

          • theotherlestrangegirl says:

            The main quote is taken from Job 41, and there’s also a mention of Numbers 2. I’ll leave a link to the article that was shared with me below. I take quite a few issues with the multiple assumptions that the author makes.

            http://www.truthingenesis.com/2013/02/20/were-there-really-fire-breathing-dragons/?fbclid=IwAR0KA2Dvy7c04JzhqiUw6vAm41vDed0g9f4gLmWw4H_7L1m7FTLuYhnpaQ4

            Liked by 1 person

          • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

            Thanks for the link, Strange Girl. I suspected Leviathan might have some involvement with the story; but I didn’t recall that it breathed fire (and I don’t think the Bible says it did).

            I think the writer did get one thing right–the connection of dinosaurs and dragons in various cultures. Huge fossilized dinosaur bones were not reserved to be discovered only by scientists but were sometimes found by people centuries ago. And what better explanation was there than–DRAGONS!

            Otherwise, I think the conclusions of the article are completely without merit.

            Like

          • theotherlestrangegirl says:

            The connection between dinosaurs and dragons is interesting, so I do think there’s a lot of fun stories out there. And I tend to be an “anything is possible” type person, so I try to remain open-minded about everything, but I think this author could have done a much better job at making his case.

            I don’t know the author or anything about him (I was told that he often writes about the connections between religion and science and is very knowledgeable about both subjects), but the thing that bothered me most, I think, was his mention that many dinosaurs had incredibly large nasal cavities for no apparent reason. He seems to imply that this must mean that some of them could breathe fire, because what else would a large nasal cavity be for? I think that’s faulty logic to say the least.

            The thing is, which he did not mention, is that sharks have the exact same thing. They have very long, large nasal cavities that give them an incredible sense of smell. They can smell prey from miles away. When you’re a predator at the top of the food chain, that makes sense. And given that dinosaurs are about as up top as you can get, plus the fact that sharks are one of the few creatures left that are as old as dinosaurs, it logically follows that dinosaurs have the same thing for the same reason. I’m not sure if the author didn’t know this and didn’t do his research, or if he did know and chose not to mention it, but that seems like a vital piece of information left out and that bugged me.

            And then, of course, there is also the issue of taking things the bible says 100 percent literally, but I think this blog has already sufficiently covered the pitfalls of doing that.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Cheryel Lemley-McRoy says:

            As a student of biblical Hebrew I learned that Jesus didn’t invent parables. Parables are an ancient teaching tool. They are meant to relate truths and ideas, and not to be taken literally. Many people argue about Jonah’s whale, and miss what the author is trying to convey. Jonah, Job, and much of the OT is parable and allegory. And I’m quite sure that what we are discussing falls into that category.

            Liked by 1 person

          • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

            Strange Girl, you raise some good points. I really like your shark explanation.

            Like

          • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

            Good points, Cheryel! I would add to your list of meaningful genre in the Bible that are not literal (parable and allegory)–myth.

            Like

  5. Cheryel Lemley-McRoy says:

    Holiday itself is a contraction of holy day. So when someone insists on Merry Christmas, just respond Happy Holy Day.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. newtonfinn says:

    Tim, this post is certainly among your best, which is indeed a large category. Thanks so much for re-blogging it. On a side note, my dad used to sit in the back of our American Baptist Church, which, unusually, has magnificent stained-glass windows, and ponder, during the worship service, the “IHS” in the beautiful window overlooking the chancel. He thought it meant “In His Steps,” and I never desired to correct him.

    Liked by 1 person

    • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

      Newton, IHS = In His Steps; I never heard this before. But some people think it comes from Constantine’s vision ‘In this sign conquer’ (In hoc signo vinces).

      Like

  7. This piece was a good one. Also, “War on Christmas” sounds violent, and there is nothing violent going on here.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Dennis Wade says:

    Although I have seen it in writing, I have never had anyone actually say “Xmas”, instead of “Christmas” when wishing me well at this time of year. And almost everyone I meet does say “Merry Christmas”, instead of “Happy Holidays”, whether they are thinking of Jesus or not. And no matter what they say, it’s always a wonderful feeling to have people wishing me well at this time of year.

    I have, however, often had the thought that what passes as “Christianity” in a lot of places should instead be called “Xianity’, because it really seems to be lacking Jesus!

    Liked by 2 people

    • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

      Dennis, now that you mention it I don’t think I ave ever heard anyone SAY Xmas either. It is more of a written form. And I really like your comment that “what passes as “Christianity” in a lot of places should instead be called “Xianity’, because it really seems to be lacking Jesus!” Very clever! And true!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Sojourner says:

    Let me start by saying I greatly enjoy the Christmas season. There was a time when I was among the most critical of those who did not believe the way I believed, talk the way I talked and perform the way I performed. I believed that there was a large gulf between believers and nonbelievers that could only be removed when one received Christ into their life the right way and went on to live a righteous life. My purpose and goal in life was to be a winner of souls in this world, rescuing them from the inevitable eternal flames of hell fire which would be their due if they did not come to believe in and follow Christ in this world before their physical death. I will refrain here from quoting scripture from the Bible which I believed supported this approach to the spreading or preaching of the gospel or good news. There I was. And now, here I am. There is a quote I want to share from an author I greatly respect, Wm Paul Young, author of “The Shack.” I heard this today while listening to episode 5 of his TV series, “Restoring The Shack “ which I found on YouTube. “ The gospel is not that you can receive Jesus into your life. The gospel is that Jesus has already received you into His life, into His relationship with the Father, into His anointing in the Holy Spirit. This is the good news. You (meaning everyone) were included. You may not know it. In fact, you may not even want it. Sorry, it is the truth of who you are.” If this statement is true, then everyone we know or meet, agree with or not, like or dislike etc etc is already included in the universal body of Christ. That being the case, it would suffice us all to remember that in our dialogue with and about others, be it in person or in writing such as in blogs, we are talking with and about our family members. I guess that is why I enjoy the Christmas season so much. In the midst of all the brokenness and misery we see and experience in this life, there is hope for healing of relationships for individuals and nations in the birth of Jesus the Christ message. Peace on earth, goodwill toward men. I’m not saying, I’m just saying.

    Liked by 3 people

    • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

      Sojourner, I remember so clearly when I like this as well!: “There was a time when I was among the most critical of those who did not believe the way I believed, talk the way I talked and perform the way I performed. I believed that there was a large gulf between believers and nonbelievers that could only be removed when one received Christ into their life the right way and went on to live a righteous life. My purpose and goal in life was to be a winner of souls in this world, rescuing them from the inevitable eternal flames of hell fire which would be their due if they did not come to believe in and follow Christ in this world before their physical death.”

      I had no idea at the time but this was a terrible belief! And you do not have to quote the supporting ‘scriptures’; I am sure I know them all! Thanks for sharing the wonderful Paul Young quote; I don’t think I have heard it before.

      Let me join you in saying, “Peace on earth, goodwill toward men.”

      Liked by 1 person

  10. newtonfinn says:

    Yes, if Jesus is the Logos through which the entire universe came into existence, then all things (not only all human beings) inherently participate in his being whether they know it or not. Indeed, according to the sheep and goats scenario, many people who do not know him in the formal sense live lives more deeply connected to him than do many others who bandy about his name. This is why the Social Gospel has always attracted me, while direct and express evangelism has always tended to push me away. Although perhaps falsely attributed to St. Francis, this saying has been a guideline for the way I have tried to live my life as a Christian and a clergyman: “Preach the gospel, use words if necessary.”

    Liked by 2 people

    • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

      Newton, I think the ‘Social Gospel’ has been misguidedly opposed and condemned ever since the time of social gospel pioneer Walter Rauschenbusch. It has always attracted me as well. I agree that we need to “Preach the gospel, [and] use words if necessary.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • Sojourner says:

      I really like that. “Preach the gospel. Use words if necessary.” Had a coffee cup with that saying on it. I wonder where it went off to.

      Liked by 2 people

  11. newtonfinn says:

    As small gifts to my friends here at JWOB, and in gratitude for all that the words and feelings they have shared over the years have meant to me–and in gratitude to Tim who has made all of this possible–I offer again two very different Christmas meditations written a number of years ago. May the blessings of this holy season abide with each and every one of you.

    https://newtonfinn.com/2011/12/15/the-harder-edge-of-christmas/

    https://newtonfinn.com/2011/12/16/the-answer-of-christmas/

    Liked by 2 people

    • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

      Newton, thank you so much for sharing these two excellent reflections on the Christmas event. They are different but both are very good. You are a deep thinker and I appreciate that.

      Like

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