More about Progressive Christians and How to Connect with Them

Last time we talked about who progressive Christians are and some things they tend to believe. High on the list of what most of them do NOT believe are harmful doctrines like angry god, inerrancy, hell, legalism, penal substitution, homophobia, patriarchy, demons, Young Earth Creationism, and rapture and end-times theology. But there are some beliefs on which progressive believers think differently among themselves.

progressives

Progressive Christian Beliefs

There is no ‘Progressive Christian Creed’. Progressives generally think that how we behave toward others is much more important than what doctrines we embrace; so there are a variety of doctrinal views among progressives, and that’s okay. There is no list of views one must believe to be progressive, but there is remarkable agreement on certain important aspects of the faith.

We mentioned in the first paragraph ten harmful conservative beliefs that most progressive Christians no longer believe. However, progressives are not defined just by what they don’t believe. The positive side of what they believe is connected to the teaching and practice of Jesus—particularly in regard to how we should treat other people.

Progressive Christians believe in loving other people and not hating or hurting them. They believe in treating other people right—with empathy, compassion, and care—especially the needy and the marginalized. Progressives tend to be very inclusive of others rather than exclusive as many fundamentalist and evangelical believers are. Progressives take Jesus’ teaching and example on these things very seriously.

Therefore progressive believers tend to promote social justice, whether that means affirming LGBTs, speaking and acting against racism, protesting the abuse of women and children, or supporting the care of marginalized people of all kinds. Empathy, compassion, and care.

There are a few significant beliefs on which progressives disagree but this does not mean they are at war with each other—they simply have come to different conclusions on these matters.

Very many progressive Christians believe in Jesus’ resurrection and in his impact on our future destiny (as I do) while continuing to be inclusive of other religions. Others do not think Jesus was resurrected and generally believe all religions lead to the same place. Some progressives are universalists, while others believe in the possibility of annihilation for those who finally reject God’s offer of eternal life. And then there are some who do not believe in an afterlife at all.

Getting in Touch with Progressive Believers

Today, we are fortunate to have many excellent progressive writers and bloggers—so many that I cannot list them all here. Some very popular writers among progressives are Rachel Held Evans, Nadia Bolz-Weber, Pete Enns, and Rob Bell. You might have heard of some of these writers, but there are many many more! For you progressive believers reading this article, I encourage you to go to comment section and share your favorite progressive writers and how to find them. You could be a great help to newer people on the journey. And please share your favorites even if others have already shared them.

There are also places where one can find groups of progressive writers together.

* Patheos Progressive Christian lists more than 80 progressive bloggers! Have fun!

* Jesus without Baggage Resource Pages feature articles by myself and others on many specific issues, and you can also connect to the blogs of the other progressive writers through their links. To find the resource pages, simply go to the top of this page and hover over Resources on Harmful Beliefs or Resources on Following Jesus in the menu field. Of course Jesus without Baggage is, itself, a progressive blog focusing on assisting and supporting those who are questioning beliefs they have been taught by conservative churches.

* There are a number of excellent progressive Facebook communities where readers discuss issues, ask questions, and share articles. Two of my favorites are Progressive Christians and Progressing Church (based in the UK but with members from elsewhere as well). Progressive believers who are reading this article, please suggest your favorite websites and Facebook communities in the comment section below.

Where to Find Progressive Churches

A problem many people have when leaving fundamentalism and traditional evangelicalism behind is finding a new church that is compatible with their new perspectives.

The good news is that many denominations tend to be progressive, but be aware that this varies from congregation to congregation within each denomination—some local congregations in these denominations can be very conservative on some issues; just check them out. If you have been fundamentalist or evangelical you might be unfamiliar with some of these denominations, but here is a list of churches to investigate.

* American Baptist Church (but not Southern Baptist)
* Cooperative Baptist Fellowship (but not Southern Baptist)
* Disciples of Christ
* Episcopal Church
* Evangelical Lutheran Church in America – ELCA (but not Missouri Lutheran Synod)
* Presbyterian Church, USA (but not Presbyterian Church in America)
* United Church of Christ (but not the Church of Christ or Christian Church)
* United Methodist Church

In addition, I have found that churches that are affirming (not just welcoming) of LGBTs tend to be progressive in other areas as well. Here is a handy list of affirming churches around the world–just type in your address or town.

You Are Not Alone on Your Journey

I mentioned last time how I felt alone for years on my spiritual journey away from fundamentalism and evangelicalism before discovering progressive Christianity. If you feel alone on your journey, I hope this article will help you connect with others on similar journeys.

***

This entry was posted in behavior, doubt, evangelicalism, fundamentalism, Jesus, love and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

57 Responses to More about Progressive Christians and How to Connect with Them

  1. Sojourner says:

    Good article Tim and short enough for me to read in one sitting while having my morning coffee. As I read it I was thinking back to about 10 years of all when a group of fellow believers and myself decided to have a Sunday afternoon gathering in our various homes. We would eat together, worship together and have a short message from one of us or something we found on a CD or DVD. We discovered the Norma series on DVD put out by Rob Bell which became one of our favorites. Around the same period a friend that I met in a coffee shop told me that she thought I would enjoy reading “The Shack.“ She added, “as long as you can get past God being a black woman.” Since then I have read The Shack three times and I also saw the movie once at a theater and once at home on a DVD that I bought. I have also watched many YouTube videos of Paul Young’s, (author of The Shack) interviews and messages. I’m quite sure Paul Young fits the bill of a progressive Christian. I would encourage people to check him out on YouTube or go to his website wmpaulyoung.com. Thanks again Tim for encouraging us to share with each other our resources as we continue to engage in this conversation and our individual quest for truth. We need each other.

    Liked by 2 people

    • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

      Sojourner, you seem to be a big Shack fan. Good for you! I agree with you that we need to share resources with each other. By the way, I try to keep my articles to 980 words or less.

      Like

  2. John JP Patterson says:

    Progressive Methodists – All Really Are Welcome! Through the power of God’s Holy Spirit, may we live, love, and act in ways that grow the Beloved Community of Jesus Christ for ALL people. https://www.facebook.com/groups/progressivemethodists/

    In essentials, unity; in non-essentials, liberty; in all things, charity.
    ___

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Tim Ellison says:

    C Baxter Kruger and Michael Hardin will give you progressive from a peace perspective. Also Peter Rollins is a genius ( currently touring with Rob Belk)

    Liked by 2 people

  4. newtonfinn says:

    Wise and practical advice here, c/o Tim, who has made the journey from conservative to progressive Christian belief (and practice) the hard way. Let me offer a supplemental bit of advice that goes in a slightly different direction. For those making this journey, for which Jesus Without Baggage is immensely helpful, there can come a time when a person needs not only to know which beliefs to change but also which beliefs to hold onto. Being securely moored in certain bedrock beliefs about Jesus can provide a safe bridge from the conservative side of faith to the progressive side. In that regard, let me again mention for the umpteenth time a wonderful book that has meant so much to me in my somewhat different spiritual development–essentially, a deepening of the liberal mainstream Christianity of my childhood and youth.

    There’s a highly-respected NT scholar now at Princeton who is a master of Biblical scholarship, a pioneer in the quest of the historical Jesus, and also a profoundly committed Christian in the traditional (though not the conservative) sense. His name is Dale Allison, and the book I recommend is “The Historical Christ and the Theological Jesus.” What it did for me, and might do for you, was allow me to hold fast, as a constant, to the Jesus I knew and loved, while venturing out into a turbulent sea of theological variables. I, for one, needed that grounding and assurance, the knowledge that that while my faith was in need of expansion and revision, I was not in any way drawing apart from Jesus in making this journey, but was actually moving closer toward him.

    The last chapter of this book, where Allison speaks not as a scholar but directly from his heart, believer to believer, has become a precious part of my devotional reading and meditation. Maybe this unusual book, so inspiring in its coupling of cutting-edge scholarship with human vulnerability and humility, can serve a similar function for some of my brothers and sisters who courageously share their spiritual struggles on this extraordinary website.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Chelsea says:

      Thank you for this recommendation. I’m stumbling around in the journey from a conservative AG background into…somewhere…and wrestling with keeping Jesus in the midst of questioning much. This book sounds like it could be just what I’ve been looking for. Many thanks.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Sojourner says:

      Thank you Newtonfinn and all the others who have given suggestions and references for us seekers of truth along a more Progressive Christian pathway. I can really relate to what you said about holding onto Jesus while “venturing out into a turbulent sea of theological variables.” I imagine many of those variables would be considered “baggage” by many of us on this blog. I will be ordering Dale Allison’s book that you suggested pronto. I am at a place right now where I see the Bible as the perpetrator of much of this baggage. I know there is much to read concerning this subject. My question in one sentence is, “What do I do with the Bible if it is not inerrant? I refuse to get into sword fights (blasting one another with scripture) in order to prove my beliefs are inerrant. I’m pretty sure there’s no such thing as inerrancy as far as us humans go. I can actually relate to Pontious Pilot’s question to Jesus, “What is truth?” Don’t get me wrong. I do believe Jesus is “the way, the truth and the life” but I’m not always sure what to do with it. From what I have written here it may sound to some like I am in great turmoil. That is not the case at all. In my 38 year surrendered life to Jesus, I have never had more peace than I’ve had the past few years as I have realized that much of what I believed and practiced was man made baggage. What I am continuing to learn is “…the letter kills, but the Spirit gives life.”

      Liked by 2 people

      • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

        Sojourner, I can resonate with your saying that you have more peace now than in the past few years. The journey away from baggage can be difficult, but it results in peace, freedom, and loss of fear.

        Like

    • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

      Newton, thanks for sharing the recommend!

      Like

  5. I am a universalist, though I’m not dogmatic about it. It’s a new and deeply held belief of mine that I am thankful to God for introducing to me. Slowly but surely, I am finding that those things progressives “don’t” believe are becoming things I don’t believe, either. Some of them I don’t necessarily find harmful, but others I find are horrid and ghastly. I’m definitely on a journey, and inclusion is the name of the game. I’ve specifically been finding guidance in the writings of John Eldridge, Brad Jersak, Brian Zahnd, Peter Hiett, and others. This blog, too, has helped me arrange my thoughts amazingly well.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Kayla says:

    Another progressive site I really enjoy is Christian Feminism Today. As their name suggests, they deal a lot with Christian women’s issues. Their site features a lot more than that too, though, everything from LGBTQ rights to racial issues. It’s a great “melting pot” of sorts for progressive Christians.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Judy Hornbrook says:

    United Church of Canada …progressive!! And, I love it!

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Honest Faith says:

    If you are looking for more Progressive Christian Writers…. Cough cough… over here… cough cough…

    Liked by 2 people

  9. sheila0405 says:

    My brother-in-law died 2 weeks ago, from a sudden heart attack. He was on life support for a week before my sister had to make the terrible decision to end that support. The funeral was in a United Methodist Church. I was amazed by the difference there. Every other church I’ve been in has been very judgmental in their theology. Not this one! Only love & kindness was displayed. Now I know why my dear sweet sister, a widow at 59, is also so kind. I recommend that denomination!

    Liked by 2 people

  10. I recommend the Slacktivist: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/

    Also, the UCC is very liberal/progressive as a denomination, but my pastor friend has found many local churches to be quite conservative. So you have to be careful.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Perry says:

    So we’ll explained. Thanks! I’ve always felt that if there’s a “gift” I have, it’s empathy for those who are marginalized. All my children also show this characteristic. Put them in a room, & they’ll never gravitate towards the VIP’s; they’ll always go to those who seem most in need of validation. Thanks, Tim, for beautifully reminding us how important it is to include, not exclude, others.

    Liked by 2 people

    • newtonfinn says:

      In this comment, you put your finger on the deepest level of what Jesus lived and tried to demonstrate. “The first shall be last, and the last shall be first,” applies not only to how we are to relate to our fellow human beings (and to all living things, IMHO) but also to the thoughts and feelings we should preference in our hearts and minds. If we get the priority and centrality of loving universally, especially “the least of these,” then the appropriate theology, which will be as different and unique as each of us individual believers are different and unique, will follow. And in the mysterious way God moves, this finding of our distinctly personal paths will bind us together.

      Liked by 1 person

    • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

      Perry, you and your children are excellent examples!

      Like

  12. Tim, I’ve read over these posts and I believe that they have one thing in common. None of the contributors it seems apparent really believe all of the things that Jesus himself is recorded to have said. I can understand why that would be the case. If one does not take as truth what is recorded in the gospels then you must pick out only what fits your own thinking. Which is really no different than the conservative views that are being relegated by most of the contributors to the untruth pile. And it’s really no different than the religious leaders of Jesus own day.
    I don’t believe what most of the conservative teachers believe either but for completely different reasons. In fact most of them can’t agree on what is truth. Just as you they gloss over what does not fit their perspective. I personally believe that scripture can be understood to convey truth, and, yes, they miss it sometimes completely. We all can miss it, but trying to understand it is certainly different than not believing it.
    Tim you often claim to accept that those close to Jesus, who recorded what he said, should be trusted to record what He said truthfully; and to be considered to be as clear as humanly possible to what he said and meant. At least I think that is what you say. Yet it is clear to me that you can’t believe it when he says for instance that many will fall away before he returns. That statement will have to be interpreted to mean something else entirely by you, in order for you to believe what you convey as your belief. It also seems that you would not accept any of his pronouncements regarding judgment of religious leaders of his day even though you have also relegated conservative teachers to that same fate. For example Jesus stated that the leaders of his day claimed to follow Moses and that it was Moses who spoke of him. His point seems clear. The Holy Spirit leads us into all truth as he also told us. What does that mean to most who don’t believe that you can accept what his followers penned? You, in fact, as I understand the progressive mind set don’t follow what Moses penned either, But it seems as though Jesus did. What should that mean to us?

    Liked by 1 person

    • newtonfinn says:

      Jerry, it’s even worse than you think. Many progressive Christians (and Jews) don’t believe that Moses penned anything at all in the Bible. Indeed, many progressive Christians (and Jews) don’t even believe that Moses was a real historical person capable of penning anything. On the other hand, it would appear that Jesus, as a first century Jew, did believe in a Moses who penned a good portion of the Hebrew scriptures, in much the same manner that he probably also believed in a three-story universe. That’s just how people thought back then. Is it your contention that 21st Century Christians should go through the requisite mental gyrations to see the Bible and the world, physically and historically, as Jesus saw them?

      Liked by 2 people

      • Good question Tim, I’m not thinking that Jesus is that normal person. He seems to see the future as well as the past.

        Liked by 1 person

        • newtonfinn says:

          I’m not Tim, Jerry, who has yet to respond to your comment, but merely another reader of and participant in Jesus Without Baggage. But I would suggest that you put your finger on a key difference between conservative and progressive interpretations of scripture. The former assumes that Jesus, as a specific human being at a particular point and place in history, was nevertheless omniscient, at least to some extent, in light of his divine status as the Son of God. The latter, on the other hand, believes that this incarnation as a particular human being was complete, and that Jesus, while remaining God’s ultimate revelation of His “character” and will, had the same limitations concerning knowledge of physical and historical things as did his First Century contemporaries. Much of what defines and divides these two theological camps stems from this fundamental difference in understanding the incarnation.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Well stated Newton, Jesus did state that everything he did and said was coming to him from the Father. Seems to imply that he had emptied himself of omniscience. His level of obedience makes one think that he had much more understanding of his own situation than even the most yielded human would have. I be done several posts lately on The predestination vs free will debate. If I were a 5 point Calvinist I could simply state that he had no choice he was just in total control of the Father. But I’m not so as a free will agent Jesus must have had a choice to pay a very costly price for you and I to have entrance into his Fathers kingdom. Thanks for your kind informative response.

            Liked by 2 people

          • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

            Well said, Newton.

            Like

        • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

          Jerry, I am not sure Jesus could see the future OR the past, though I think he was very observant, such as in the discussion of the fall of Jerusalem which occurred in 70AD.

          Liked by 1 person

      • scraffiti says:

        A few years ago I gave upon a theological degree after a year for the very reasons stated in your comment, Newton. Agreement regarding biblical origins and Moses authorship is simply impossible. It really comes down to ‘choosing’ what you believe (call it faith if you like). I’m afraid that I am doubter with regard to Moses existence and I came to that conclusion as neither a progressive Christian or a Jew. Genesis was written over a very long period and unless you believe Moses was centuries old it could not have been written by one person. The bigger question is how does someone write about one’s own death? I have other reasons which are too long for here. I’m just don’t know how anybody can be certain of biblical origins whether old testament or new. Whilst I like your ‘mental gyrations’ analogy, isn’t it all a choice?

        Liked by 2 people

        • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

          Scraffiti, I agree that Moses did not write Genesis and perhaps did not exist at all.

          Liked by 1 person

        • newtonfinn says:

          Scraffiti, have you ever checked out Freud’s “Moses and Monotheism?” If memory serves, it’s there that he speculates, in fascinating fashion, that Moses (a name which derives from the Egyptian word for child) was a Egyptian government official or big shot of some kind who took a liking to a small band of enslaved Jews and rescued them by leading them out of Egypt, a society which at this time was rigidly monotheistic. Freud then suggests that what really happened in the wilderness was that this small band of Jews soon soured of the grueling wilderness experience, turned on Moses, and killed him, which accounts for the rather vague demise of Moses in the scriptural account. What follows, again according to Freud’s theorizing, is that the Jews became remorseful about what they had done to the point of being traumatized, which caused them to deeply embrace the monotheism Moses had taught them and to engage, century after century, in a repression-based cult of ritual sacrifice, in which they unconsciously re-enacted the murder of Moses by slaughtering totem animals. This continual re-enactment followed the classic neurotic pattern of “the return of the repressed,” serving psychologically to alleviate or expiate their secret sin of “patricide.” You can imagine how this kind of speculation would play out even further in the NT and its passion story, in which the Lamb of God becomes a sacrifice for the original sin of all human beings–not the eating of an apple (a rather strange kind of sin in light of the extreme consequences) but rather the killing of the father, the actual consummation of Freud’s famous Oedipus Complex. Not saying I buy into this Freudian stuff all that much, but it is tantalizing.

          Liked by 1 person

          • scraffiti says:

            Thanks for this, Newton. I’ve never seen this before and it is quite stunning. Somewhat tangential but I read a lot of John Dominic Crossan who is a former Catholic priest turned academic. He also reads very deeply into NT accounts and scours the culture, politics and history surrounding any particular account. I do recommend him if you like a challenging read.

            Liked by 2 people

      • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

        Well said, Newton.

        Like

    • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

      Jerry, you said: “Tim you often claim to accept that those close to Jesus, who recorded what he said, should be trusted to record what He said truthfully; and to be considered to be as clear as humanly possible to what he said and meant.”

      Jerry, I do not necessarily believe the gospels are work-for-word accurate. And some of what is in the gospels reflects the issues, agenda, and theology of the writers at the time they were written. What I do say is that the gospels present a consistent portrait of Jesus’ character in his teaching and character so that I am compelled to follow him.

      I am unsure what you mean by, “Yet it is clear to me that you can’t believe it when he says for instance that many will fall away before he returns.” I don’t dismiss that. But why would, “That statement…have to be interpreted to mean something else entirely by you, in order for you to believe what you convey as your belief”?

      “It also seems that you would not accept any of his pronouncements regarding judgment of religious leaders of his day.” I fully accept Jesus’ words of judgment of certain Pharisees, though I might not understand them as you do.

      It appears that one of us does not fully understand what the other is saying. And that could be me. Can you clarify?

      Liked by 2 people

      • Tim, it always comes down to interpretation. Jesus words were condemning of religious people who were wrong in his view. When speaking to Nicodemus he called him out for being a teacher and not knowing what Jesus was teaching him concerning the new birth, so falling away most likely would mean from declared truth? What would it mean to you? And if it is the truth how would you determine it?

        Liked by 1 person

        • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

          Jerry, when many believers talk about the ‘new birth’ or being ‘born again’ I think they bring to it a misguided understanding of ‘being saved’. I don’t think Jesus had that in mind at all. Rather, he meant that we (and Nicodemus) must abandon the framework of our old perspectives and see things in a fresh way.

          I explore this idea here if you are interested:
          https://jesuswithoutbaggage.wordpress.com/2015/10/26/entering-the-kingdom-requires-abandoning-old-religious-systems/

          Like

          • You may be taking a big risk Jesus is the one who stated that one must be born again in order to enter the kingdom. So what is meant when his disciples speak of salvation? I read your take out of courtesy to you, and then I’ll comment.

            Liked by 1 person

          • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

            Jerry, I agree with you that Jesus said one must be born again, but what does that mean. I suggest that it does not mean what many believers think it does–to accept Jesus as your personal savior and be ‘saved’. Rather it means to see with new eyes. Did you read the article?

            Another question is what does it mean to enter the kingdom? Does it mean to eventually go to ‘heaven’ or to become part of God’s living kingdom on Earth right now?

            Liked by 1 person

  13. Heather greig says:

    Tim, what do you think of modern churches such as hillsong and others similar. Would you class them as ‘Progressive Christian’

    Thanks Heather

    Liked by 1 person

    • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

      Heather, I am not that familiar with Hillsong Church except that it has been tremendously influential in the use of worship music in church services. Many believers consider themselves ‘progressive’ BECAUSE of using worship music instead of hymns and traditional Christian music. This is a valid use of ‘progressive’ but it is not the same as being ‘theologically progressive’ as shared in my articles–using ‘progressive’ in these different ways causes confusion from time-to-time.

      To better answer your question, I did some googling of what Hillsong believes. What I found is that among their doctrinal views are traditional roles for women and girls, support for Creationism, and belief that homosexuality is contrary to biblical teaching.

      Their statement of Faith includes: We believe that the Bible is God’s Word. It is accurate, authoritative and applicable to our everyday lives; We believe that the Lord Jesus Christ…died on the cross in our place; and, We believe that our eternal destination of either Heaven or hell is determined by our response to the Lord Jesus Christ.

      All these beliefs are typically traditional evangelical beliefs rather than theologically progressive ones. So I would say that Hillsong is progressive in the worship music sense but not in the theological sense.

      I hope this is helpful.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Heather greig says:

        I just wanted to get your take on the way a lot of young modern churches are and what they teach. I grew up in a church similar to hillsong. Lots of young people and not judgmental of where people were in life. But yes it was all based on what the bible says just repacked for today. There was a lot people from different walks of life, age, race, class, gay and straight in the church. They believe that god would lead you to do what was right if you were believing in him. Despite this relaxed, fun way of church I found myself at a crossroads wondering if I believed everything I grew up hearing. I had to make “god” make sense to me and I felt there wasn’t much room for me to explore that. That’s when I found your blog.
        If you ever go to one near where you live, let me know, really interested in what you’d think Theologically about it and the atmosphere etc . The pastor will most probably look very young with ripped jeans and tattoos Haha

        Liked by 1 person

        • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

          Heather, I have heard very good things about Hillsong. Just because they have some different beliefs than I do does not mean I oppose them. I don’t know how aggressive they are on views like rejecting LGBTs or focusing on eternal punishment in hell.

          If I ever have opportunity I would love to visit one of their churches.

          Like

  14. michaeleeast says:

    Tim, It is good that we can connect.
    My favorites are: John Churcher @ Permission to Speak (UK)
    Roger Ray @ Community Christian Church Springfield Missouri.
    I also have many friends on facebook.
    Progressive Christianity seems to be a grassroots movement.
    By which I mean it is from the bottom up not the top down.
    But it is growing all the time. Because it makes sense.

    Liked by 1 person

    • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

      Michael, thanks for sharing your favorites. I think you are right that progressive Christianity seems to be a grassroots phenomenon. Many believers have progressive journeys and benefit greatly by discovering and coming together with those with similar journeys. And from that we have a significant movement.

      Like

  15. Pingback: What is a Progressive Christian? | Jesus Without Baggage

  16. John Draper says:

    Tim, is there any evidence of progressive Christian beliefs being held by a sizable number of believers in the first two centuries?

    Liked by 1 person

    • jesuswithoutbaggage says:

      John, I think that what we now call progressive beliefs are in contrast to some of today’s fundamentalist and traditional evangelical beliefs. One could also ask if fundamentalist and traditional evangelical beliefs were held by sizable numbers of believers in the first two centuries.

      But I suggest that an example of progressive belief in the NT include Paul’s opposition to the burden of legalism–observing the Law.

      Like

  17. Yup. These are all good suggestions. I can also vouch for the Progressive Christians Facebook group…one thing I love about it is that it’s interdenominational, so people from all sorts of backgrounds can find a home on that group.

    Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.